YouTubers Escape Punishment For Promoting CSGO Gambling Site Without Disclosure

Allan Goodman
September 10, 2017

While the deal doesn't require the two to admit any culpability nor does it include a fine, future infractions could cost more than $40,000 per violation, according to an FTC spokesperson who spoke with Glixel about the case.

The fallout prompted responses from both Martin and Cassell, with Martin posting a lengthy video apology in the hopes of clearing his name.

Trevor "TmarTn" Martin and Thomas "ProSyndicate" Cassel had gained a significant following on YouTube from where the duo promoted the CSGOLotto.com website around the clock as a premium destination for players to place bets and rake in valuable in-game items.

"Consumers need to know when social media influencers are being paid or have any other material connection to the brands endorsed in their posts", Chairman Maureen Ohlhausen said in a statement. (CS:GO Betting)", and "ALL OR NOTHING!

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In June of previous year, it was revealed that both TmarTn and Syndicate had ownership stakes in CSGO Lotto.

Finally, the complaint alleges that a number of Martin's, Cassell's, and the gaming influencers' CSGO Lotto videos and social media posts deceptively failed to adequately disclose that Martin and Cassell are owners and officers of the company operating the gambling service, or that the influencers received compensation to promote it. The agency this week took its first action against an influencer. "Accordingly, if you have a material connection with the marketer of a tagged brand, then your posts should disclose that connection".

The 21 influencers sent letters today were among the 90 prominent Instagram users who also got letters from the FTC in April telling influencers to disclose their relationships with brands in posts and providing them with the FTC's Endorsement Guide. For example, some of the letters noted that the staff believe that tagging a brand is an endorsement of the brand.

This week, the FTC sent warning letters to 21 influential Instagram users, reminding them that if they've been paid for particular posts, they must disclose it. It has also issued an updated version of its official endorsement guidelines, indicating that it's taking the CS:GO Lotto story and its aftermath seriously. Today's consent agreement will be subject to public comment until October 10th, at which point the commission will decide whether to make the order final. The FTC will publish a description of the consent agreement package in the Federal Register shortly.

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