NASA's Halloween playlist features the universe's spookiest sounds

Delia Watkins
November 1, 2017

NASA has sent hundreds of spacecrafts in outer space to capture images of the darkest corners of the universe.

The sinister sounds feature eerie radio emissions from Saturn to hair-raising sounds from Jupiter's largest moon Ganymede, having been recorded by various missions by the space agency in recent years.

NASA revealed that the odd space sounds were captured as radiowaves, which have now been converted into sound waves of "howling planets" and whispering noises from distant stars. This was captured on audio by the United States space agency.

Some of these radio signals were translated into sounds to understand the signal better, the process also known as "data sonification".

Kurdish President Offers to Step Down
Kurdish Peshmerga fighters and coalition forces had controlled the territory in northern Iraq for years after they pushed out Islamic State, or IS, militants.

The sounds are spooky, but that's not all that makes them worthy of a listen. From howling planets to whistling helium and odd moons, this is how space Halloween sounds like. At the beginning of the compilation, you can hear Juno Crossing Jupiter's Bow Shock.

Some of the sounds that NASA has to offer for this Halloween 2017 found, for example, the recording wave plasma detected by the probe, Van Allen, or even the "roar of Jupiter" that recorded the probe Juno. The resulting whooshing and whistling sounds turned into a deep boom as Juno moved further inside the planet. The sound creates "a rhythmic cacophony" across space. These emissions are closely related to the auroras near the poles of the planet, according to the statement.

The eerie sound is similar to the emissions recorded on Earth during the aurora borealis in the northern hemisphere. In total, 22 records of a few tens of seconds are available in free access on the playlist posted on the website Soundcloud.

Other reports by PlayStation Move reviews

Discuss This Article

FOLLOW OUR NEWSPAPER